Watching TV Is Causing Us To Die Young!

Watching TV Is Causing Us To Die Young!

  Let’s be honest with ourselves.  How many hours do you and your family spend watching TV each day? Each week?  It’s probably too much.   Kami, haven’t you heard the common phrase ‘moderation in all things’!?!? Frequently.  BUT according to studies, the American public hasn’t figured out how to moderately watch TV.   Children ages 2 to 11 watch an average of 24 hours of TV a week or 3.5 hours a day.  Teens ages 12 to 17 watch 22 hours a week.  Ages 18 to 24 watch 25 hours weekly and after that it rises steadily until people over 65 average 48 hours a week, or nearly seven hours a day.  This is ONLY TV watching.  This doesn’t include hours spent on video games, computers, or smart devices.  Scary.   The Journal of the American Medical Association combined data from eight studies and found that for every two hours people spend watching TV a day, their risk of developing type 2 diabetes increases by 20% and their risk of heart disease increases by 15%.  And for every additional three hours the study participants spent in front of the TV, their risk of dying from any cause during the respective studies jumped 13%, on average.   Watching TV may cause you to die young!   Spending hours on our derrieres watching TV interferes and decreases desire to do other healthy activities such as physical exercise, enjoying the outdoors, cooking healthy meals, reading, spending quality time with loved ones, and getting the appropriate amount of sleep.    Sedentary activities AKA watching TV is a major contributor to our obesity epidemic.  Two-thirds of U.S. adults are overweight or...
Have you decided yet?

Have you decided yet?

Decision making.  Sometimes I love it like when choosing a nail polish color during a pedicure.  AND sometimes I hate it like when trying to decide where to eat with a group of friends that have no dining preferences or opinions.   Whether love or hate is involved, decisions have to be made.   We decide whether to wake up on the first annoyingly perky alarm or to hit snooze 5 times, wake up late, and curse before the day even begins.   We decide whether to take time to get ready or to use one knee to drive in order to put on mascara while looking in the rear-view mirror.   We decide whether to eat a healthy, nutritious breakfast or run out the door with a glass of juice/coffee/diet coke and a doughnut or not eat breakfast at all.   These horribly unhealthy decisions make me wince (although I’ve been a snooze hitter once or twice in my time).  The best part of decision making is we can change and improve our ability to make decisions!   One critical part of being healthy is making the decision that you want to leave that unhealthy lifestyle behind.  No looking back.   How did you make life changing decisions like your career choice, marriage/long-term partner, having children, or where to live? Deciding to live a healthy lifestyle is just as critical as these choices.   Without health, you will be miserable and exhausted working.  You won’t have energy to nurture your relationships.  You won’t be able to chase your kids around the playground without being winded.  You will also miss out...
What’s your motivation?

What’s your motivation?

One of my greatest accomplishments was graduating from nursing school.   Each semester consisted of 16 credits, give or take.  16 credits isn’t bad, you say?  These were ‘nursing’ credits.  In addition to classes, there were labs, clinicals, and post clinical meetings. These added about 12 to 20 hours (sometimes more) a week on top of classroom time.  THEN add on studying, projects, nursing care plans, papers, and assignments.  Don’t get me wrong, I definitely still found time to play, but nursing school was a challenge.   When I was lacking motivation or struggling with school, I reflected on why I was doing nursing in the first place. I enjoy learning about the human body, its functions, and disease processes.  I also ultimately wanted to make a difficult, scary, and uncertain situation for someone a little bit better.  Remembering my motivation helped me push through the hard times.   I do the same when making healthy choices.  When I’m near death during one of my workouts, I dig deep and remember my motivation and why I’m choosing to live healthy.   My father passed away in 2011 when I was pregnant with my first child.  He had suffered with Parkinson’s disease for 17 years and passed away suddenly one morning.  Ever since I was 12, I saw my father struggle with health.   That’s my motivation.  Longevity.  I want to have a long, healthy, productive, quality life for myself, husband, children, and future grandchildren.  If you’re going to successfully change into a healthy lifestyle, you need to figure out what’s your motivation for doing so.     Do you...
The Forbidden Word ‘DIET’

The Forbidden Word ‘DIET’

I despise the word ‘diet’.  I know people who cringe or get the goose bumps from hearing words such as ‘moist’ or from the feel of velvet or the texture of yogurt.  For me, it’s the word ‘diet’.  I have to control my impulse to shutter, roll my eyes, gag, or run out the door when I hear someone say “I’m going to start my diet tomorrow” or “I’ve been really bad at my diet today”.   This is a NO DIETING ZONE.  Diet implies a beginning and an end, starvation, deprivation, celery only, punishment, torture, and just plain self loathing.  I don’t diet.  I don’t count calories.  I live healthy.  I actually ENJOY living healthy.   I remember eating an apple and almond butter (my favorite snack) during a lunch break at work and someone commented on how much self control I had in order to eat the way I do.  I was surprised she was so surprised that I actually, legitimately enjoy it!  No torture, punishment, or deprivation here.   If you’re dieting, stop.  It will get you nowhere.  You must change your lifestyle and attitude in order to have true success in reaching your health goals.   I’m a Registered Nurse NOT a Registered Dietitian.  Although I’m formally educated on how to resuscitate you when you drop dead from all those hamburgers and fries you eat, I’m not formally educated on all the mechanics and chemistry behind nutrition.  It’s a passion of mine.   I may unintentionally (or intentionally, but well meaningly) offend you on this blog, but my desire is to motivate you to make changes...

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